Difference between revisions of "Category: Richard Rohr"

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Rohr is a really sloppy etymologist, at best. He has a prepared dismissal of [[Christians are trained to be word police|Christian word police]], but when he says "this word comes comes from x" and it... flat out doesn't, that's not word policing. It's just a very base-line concern for the truth.
 
Rohr is a really sloppy etymologist, at best. He has a prepared dismissal of [[Christians are trained to be word police|Christian word police]], but when he says "this word comes comes from x" and it... flat out doesn't, that's not word policing. It's just a very base-line concern for the truth.
  
“the early Fathers of the church dared to call [the Trinity] a divine circle dance,” using the Greek word “perichoresis, the origin of our word choreography.” - ''The Divine Dance''
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<blockquote>“the early Fathers of the church dared to call [the Trinity] a divine circle dance,” using the Greek word “perichoresis, the origin of our word choreography.” - ''The Divine Dance''</blockquote>
  
 
None of the Fathers called the Trinity a dance, they definitely weren't talking about dancing when they used the word "perichoresis", which isn't the origin of our word "choreography” (that would be ''choreuo'', not ''choreo'') [https://www.thegospelcoalition.org/reviews/the-divine-dance/ ]
 
None of the Fathers called the Trinity a dance, they definitely weren't talking about dancing when they used the word "perichoresis", which isn't the origin of our word "choreography” (that would be ''choreuo'', not ''choreo'') [https://www.thegospelcoalition.org/reviews/the-divine-dance/ ]
  
"The work of religion is to ''re-ligio''—re-ligament or reunite what our egos and survival instincts have put asunder, namely a fundamental wholeness at the heart of everything." - [https://cac.org/the-perennial-tradition-2015-12-20/ The Perennial Tradition]
+
<blockquote>"The work of religion is to ''re-ligio''—re-ligament or reunite what our egos and survival instincts have put asunder, namely a fundamental wholeness at the heart of everything." - [https://cac.org/the-perennial-tradition-2015-12-20/ The Perennial Tradition]</blockquote>
  
 
Cicero suggests religion is from ''relegere'' "go through again" (in reading or in thought) but most etymologists think it's from ''religare'' "to bind fast", via the notion of "place an obligation on," or "bond between humans and gods." Another possible origin is ''religiens'' "careful," opposite of ''negligens''. [https://www.etymonline.com/word/religion ]
 
Cicero suggests religion is from ''relegere'' "go through again" (in reading or in thought) but most etymologists think it's from ''religare'' "to bind fast", via the notion of "place an obligation on," or "bond between humans and gods." Another possible origin is ''religiens'' "careful," opposite of ''negligens''. [https://www.etymonline.com/word/religion ]

Revision as of 03:49, 18 June 2020

Richard Rohr is so prolific and aphoristic that it can be hard to get a handle on him - which is entirely the point. I have a lot of measured appreciation for his writing, except that the fruit of it in the lives of everyone I've known who have taken it too seriously is some kind of unbelief. Hence this swipe file of moments when Rohr really boned it.

Etymology

Rohr is a really sloppy etymologist, at best. He has a prepared dismissal of Christian word police, but when he says "this word comes comes from x" and it... flat out doesn't, that's not word policing. It's just a very base-line concern for the truth.

“the early Fathers of the church dared to call [the Trinity] a divine circle dance,” using the Greek word “perichoresis, the origin of our word choreography.” - The Divine Dance

None of the Fathers called the Trinity a dance, they definitely weren't talking about dancing when they used the word "perichoresis", which isn't the origin of our word "choreography” (that would be choreuo, not choreo) [1]

"The work of religion is to re-ligio—re-ligament or reunite what our egos and survival instincts have put asunder, namely a fundamental wholeness at the heart of everything." - The Perennial Tradition

Cicero suggests religion is from relegere "go through again" (in reading or in thought) but most etymologists think it's from religare "to bind fast", via the notion of "place an obligation on," or "bond between humans and gods." Another possible origin is religiens "careful," opposite of negligens. [2]