Difference between revisions of "Cognitive Behavioral Therapy"

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Latest revision as of 19:54, 16 June 2020

CBT emerged in the early 1960s as an answer to radical behaviourism and strict psychoanalysis, both of which shared the stage as the dominant psychotherapies of their day. Rather than viewing psychological problems as emerging from our family of origin (as done in psychoanalysis and psychodynamic forms of therapy) or as a function of our immediate potential for reward (as done in the behavioural therapies), the architects of CBT argued that we should look at people’s thoughts (behaviours that occur in the mind) and the events in their lives to understand the underpinnings of emotional disturbance. The idea is that when people change their thoughts (or, what psychologists call cognitions) they can also change how they feel and behave. A core tenet of CBT is that the thoughts underlying most forms of emotional distress are dysfunctional and distorted.

- David A Sbarra, Psychology’s power tools